Sixth Form Course Guide

Select a course from below (A Level unless stated)...

APPLIED SCIENCE

LEVEL 3 CERTIFICATE AND EXTENDED CERTIFICATE

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

The course is the AQA Level 3 Applied Science. This gives students the knowledge, understanding and skills that they need to prepare for employment. The qualification provides clear pathways for career development and progression opportunities to higher education and degrees.

AS Level – A certificate qualification is gained in year one and is made up of Unit 1 – Key concepts in Science, Unit 2 – Applied experimental techniques and Unit 3 – Science in the modern world.

A Level – Year 2 work gains the extended certificate, again with three units:  Unit 4 – The human body, Unit 5 – Investigating science and Unit 6 – An option unit which could be either Microbiology, Medical Physics or Organic Chemistry.

We want students who: Have a real interest in Science, especially how it is used. The course is aimed at those students who may not want to follow a pure A Level but want a more hands on course with a coursework element. We also want students who are motivated, hardworking, inquisitive, and committed as they will have to work independently and meet deadlines.

How will the students be assessed?

AS Level – Units 1 and 3 have an external exam and Unit 2 is portfolio based.

A Level – Unit 4 has an exam and Units 5 and 6 are portfolio based.

As this course is new we do not have full details of the content or assessment strategy yet.  These should be available shortly and we will update students when we receive further details.

What other courses does it complement?

Level 3 Applied Science complements Biology and Chemistry A Levels on the medical side, Physics and Engineering on the engineering side, Sports Science for sports related courses and Catering for careers in the food industry. It also supports courses that are vocational where students are thinking of taking an apprenticeship.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Level 3 Applied Science is very valuable as it demonstrates to employers and universities alike an ability to handle information in a practical context. Apprenticeship providers are very keen on this as a qualification as are firms that employ laboratory technicians. Applied Science is useful subject for students who want to pursue a career in the health service such as nursing or midwifery.

To download the course guide for Applied Science please click the link below

Applied Science course guide download

ART, CRAFT & DESIGN

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline:

Students choose one of the options below for study throughout the course:

  • Art, craft and design
  • Fine art
  • Graphic communication
  • Textile design
  • Three-dimensional design
  • Photography

Exam Board AQA                                                                                                    Further details about the course can be accessed from the AQA website: www.aqa.org.uk/artanddesign

We want students who: have an interest in, enthusiasm for and enjoy art, craft and design. Who want to push their intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive capabilities, investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement.  Who are independence of mind in developing, refining and communicating their own ideas, their own intentions and their own personal outcomes.

How will students be assessed?

  1. Personal investigation (60% of your mark) The emphasis of this component will be for the students to choose an artists, issue, concept or theme supported by 2500 – 3000 words.
  2. Externally set assignment (40% of your mark) Following the preparatory period, students must complete 15 hours of unaided, supervised time.

What other courses does it complement?

Most students who choose A Level Art, craft and design have chosen one of the practical subjects because they what to keep their options open, and want to be seen as creative.

Next steps – what this course can lead to.

The website www.studentartguide.com gives a list of 150 art related career paths leading to employment including; Advertising, Web Designers, Computer Games Designers, Fashion Designers, Illustrators, Architects, Teaching, Product graphic Designers, Interior designers etc.

To download the course guide for Art, Craft & Design please click the link below

Art, Craft & Design course guide download

BIOLOGY

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Biology A Level gives students the skills to make connections and associations with all living things around them. Biology literally means the study of life and if that’s not important, what is? Being such a broad topic, students are bound to find a specific area of interest, plus it opens the door to a fantastic range of interesting careers.

A Level

  1. Biological molecules
  2. Cells and Viruses
  3. Classification
  4. Exchange and Transport
  5. Energy for biological processes
  6. Microbiology and Pathogens
  7. Modern Genetics
  8. Origins of Genetic Variation
  9. Control Systems
  10. Ecosystems

We want students who:  Are prepared to ask difficult questions. Students will have to learn a lot of detailed facts and apply them in an intelligent manner. If a student is inquisitive about the world, they will love Biology.

Biology is one of the top ‘facilitator subjects’ required to enter good courses at outstanding universities (Russell Group). Universities are becoming increasingly aware of Biology as an indicator of analytical skill.  Biology is a prerequisite for Medicine and Veterinary Science and the growing world of Biotechnology and Pharmacology.

How will students be assessed?

  • Paper 1: Advanced Biochemistry, Microbiology and Genetics Topics 1-7 / 90 marks, 1hour 45 minutes
  • Paper 2: Advanced Physiology, Evolution and Ecology Topics 1-4 and Topics 8-10 / 90 marks, 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Biology, Topics 1-10 /120 marks, 2 hours 30minutes

There is no coursework on this course. However, students’ performance during practical work will be assessed through a series of core practicals

What other courses does it complement?

Students who take Biology often also study from a wide range of subjects, including Psychology, Sociology, PE, Chemistry, Physics, Applied Science, Health & Social Care, History and Geography.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Possible degree options: Biology, Psychology, Sport and exercise science, Medicine, Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacy Chemistry.

Possible career options: Clinical molecular geneticist, Nature conservation officer, Pharmacologist, Research scientist, Higher education lecturer, Secondary school teacher, Dentist/Doctor.

To download the course guide for Biology please click the link below

Biology course guide download

BUSINESS STUDIES

BTEC LEVEL 3 NATIONAL EXTENDED CERTIFICATE IN BUSINESS

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Sixth Form Business Studies at St Benedict’s offers a BTEC Level 3 qualification which is the equivalent to one A Level.   The BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in Business Studies from the exam board Edexcel, aims to encourage students to develop key skills in:

  • Business organisations and structures
  • The environment that business operate in
  • Innovation and Enterprise
  • Marketing and Promotion
  • Personal and Business Finance

There is one optional unit from the following:

  • Recruitment and Selection
  • Investigating Customer Service
  • Market Research
  • The English Legal System (Law)
  • Work Experience in Business

More specifically students will develop skills giving them:

  • an understanding of how marketing, research and planning and the marketing mix are used by all organisations;
  • a knowledge of a range of business organisations, and the many factors that shape the nature of organisations operating in an increasingly complex business world;
  • a knowledge of the range of human, physical, technological and financial resources required in an organisation, and how the management of these resources can impact on business performance;
  • an understanding of business and personal finance.

We want students who:

  • Are motivated and willing to work hard and have an interest in business based issues.
  • Are willing to complete independent tasks in study time in school and at home.

How will students be assessed?

The course is split into a mandatory and optional portfolio units. The mandatory units are:

  • Personal and Business Finance – written 2-hour exam in Year 12.
  • Exploring Business – internally assessed portfolio – completed and assessed in Year 12.
  • Optional unit – internally assessed portfolio – completed and assessed in Year 13.
  • Developing a Marketing Campaign – a task set and marked by the exam board, completed under supervised conditions in Year 13. Students will be provided with a case study 2 weeks beforehand to research and then have 3 hours to write up the task.

What other courses does it complement?

The course will complement a wide range of subjects, including English, Psychology, Maths, Travel and Tourism, Law, Government and Politics and many more.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

This is a course will allow you to access a wide range of further education courses at University including degrees in Business, Management, Finance and Marketing . The BTEC qualification in Business also provides a route to employment into the many diverse areas of business. These could include roles in specialist areas such as management, marketing, finance, customer service or human resources in large organisations or a more generic role in a small local business.

To download the course guide for Business Studies please click the link below

Business Studies course guide download

CHEMISTRY

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Chemistry is for thinkers, dreamers and doers!  Students who like to think and solve problems will love the challenge of this course. Those who dream of making new discoveries or of changing the world by solving the energy crisis or synthesising a new drug to treat cancer will love the scope of this course.

AS Level – Physical Chemistry

Atomic structure, Amount of substance, Bonding, Energetics, Kinetics, Chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier’s principle, Oxidation, reduction and redox equations

AS Level – Inorganic Chemistry

Periodicity, Group 2, the alkaline earth metals, Group 7(17), the halogens

AS Level – Organic Chemistry

Introduction to organic chemistry, Alkanes, Halogenoalkanes, Alkenes, Alcohols, Organic analysis

The full A level examines all the above and:

Physical Chemistry

Thermodynamics, Rate equations, Equilibrium constant Kc for homogeneous systems, Electrode potentials and electrochemical cells, Acids and bases

Inorganic chemistry

Properties of Period 3 elements and their oxides, Transition metals, Reactions of ions in aqueous solution

Organic chemistry

Optical isomerism, Aldehydes and ketones, Carboxylic acids and derivatives, Aromatic chemistry, Amines, Polymers, Amino acids, proteins and DNA, Organic synthesis, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Chromatography

We want students who:  Can cope with a challenging course and who have an interest in Chemistry. We want students who can work independently and can absorb detailed information.  Students will need to be resilient and highly motivated.

How will the students be assessed?

There will be three two hour papers worth one hundred and five marks for the first two papers and ninety for the third to assess the two years content. There is no coursework but practical understanding will be assessed in the papers.

What other courses does it complement?

Chemistry A Level complements Biology on the medical side, Physics and Engineering on the engineering side, Sports Science for sports related courses and Catering for careers in the food industry. Why doesn’t the icing sugar on a cake dissolve when it’s in the box? Ask a chemist.

Next steps

The places that A Level Chemistry can take you are legion. Here are a very few: doctor, vet, pathologist, forensic scientist, brewer, nanotechnologist, chemical engineer, cheese maker, systems analyst, the nuclear industry, plastics designer …

To download the course guide for Chemistry please click the link below

Chemistry course guide download

COMPUTER SCIENCE

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

A Level Computer Science is one of two A Level ICT and Computing courses on offer to Sixth Form students at St Benedict’s.

A Level Computer Science from the exam board OCR, aims to build on students’ computing skills gained at Key Stage 4. Specifically, it aims to encourage students to develop:

  • an understanding of, and ability to apply, the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation;
  • the ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including writing programs to do so;
  • the capacity for thinking creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically;
  • the capacity to see relationships between different aspects of computer science;
  • mathematical skills;
  • the ability to articulate the individual (moral), social (ethical), legal and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology.

During the course, students will complete four units of study; two in Year 12 and two in Year 13.

We want students who:

  • Are motivated and willing to work hard.
  • Are willing to complete independent tasks in study time in school and at home.
  • Have an interest in ICT/computing based issues.

How will students be assessed?

The course is split into a number of units:

Year 12 – AS Level

  • Unit 1 will be a written paper and will focus on the principles of computing – 50%
  • Unit 2 will be a written exam paper and will focus on algorithms and problem solving – 50%

Year 13 – A2 Level

  • Unit 1 will be a written examination theory paper and will focus on computing principles – 40%
  • Unit 2 will be a written paper that will focus on algorithms and problem solving – 40%
  • Unit 3 will be a coursework and will focus on developing a programming project – 20%

In addition to these externally assessed pieces of work, students will receive on-going assessment and feedback through project mark sheets for the coursework topics to feedback on their exam skills from written questions.

What other courses does it complement?

The course will complement a wide range of subjects, including Mathematics, Technology/Engineering and Science.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

The course will allow you to access a wide range of further education courses at University including a degree in ICT or Computing which could lead to a career in Business Management, Engineering, Computer Games Programming, Graphic Design or Mathematics.

To download the course guide for Computer Science please click the link below

Computer Science course guide download

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline
The AQA English Language A Level, aims to build on skills gained at Key Stage 4. Specifically, it aims to encourage students to:

  • develop and apply their understanding of the concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language;
  • explore data and examples of language in use;
  • engage creatively and critically with a varied programme for the study of English;
  • develop their skills as producers and interpreters of language.

We want students who: Are like language detectives probing and investigating spoken and written texts, to understand how the language they have spoken and written from a very young age is constructed.
In addition to this, to be successful, students should:

  • have a genuine curiosity about the English Language;
  • have the ability to write clearly and accurately in different forms;
  • enjoy classroom discussion and be willing to voice an opinion and listen to others;
  • be able to work independently researching areas of linguistic interest.

How will students be assessed?

This course is split into 3 teaching units.

  • Paper 1 will be a written examination – Language, the Individual and Society (A Level).
  • Paper 2 will be a written examination – Language Diversity and Change (A Level).
  • NEA: Language in Action.

In addition to these externally assessed pieces of work, students will receive on-going assessment and feedback during the course.

What other courses does it complement?

The course will complement a wide range of subjects, including English Literature, History and Philosophy and Ethics.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

English is a universal qualification which will equip students for any career involving written and/or spoken communication. It is a universally recognised qualification for entry into college/university courses particularly in the field of Arts and Humanities. Past students with this qualification have gone on to study Law, Linguistics, Journalism, Media and Education amongst other courses.

To download the course guide for English Language please click the link below

English Language course guide download

ENGLISH LITERATURE

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

A Level English Literature, from the exam board AQA, aims to build on skills gained at Key Stage 4. Specifically, it aims to encourage students to:

  • read widely and independently both set texts and others that they have selected for themselves;
  • engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them;
  • develop and effectively apply their knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation;
  • explore the contexts of the texts they are reading and others’ interpretation of them.

During the course, students will complete three units of study:

  • Literary Genres: Tragedy – A Shakespeare play, a second drama text and one further text pre-1900;
  • Texts and Genres: Elements of Crime Writing or Elements of political and social protest writing – a post-2000 novel, one collection of poetry and one further text pre-1900;
  • Non Exam Assessment: two essays of 1,2500-1,500 each on a different text, one poetry and one prose.

We want students who: are passionate about reading and love literature; who are prepared to explore brave new worlds of ideas, approaches and ways of thinking; who will listen to, build on and challenge, other people’s ideas; who will read around the subject, the author and the concepts discussed in lessons.

In addition to this, to be successful, students should:

  • have the ability to write clearly, accurately and fluently about texts;
  • enjoy classroom discussion and be prepared to voice and defend their opinions;
  • be able to work independently researching linguistic areas of interest.

How will students be assessed?

This course is split into 3 examination units.

  • Paper 1 will be a written examination – Literary Genres. 2 hours 30 minutes, closed book, 40% of A Level
  • Paper 2 will be a written examination – Texts and Genres. 3 hours, open book, 40% of A Level
  • Non Examined Assessment: Theory and Independence. 20% of A Level

In addition to these externally assessed pieces of work, students will receive on-going assessment and feedback during the course.

What other courses does it complement?

The course will complement a wide range of subjects, including English Language, History, and Philosophy and Ethics.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

English Literature is a universal qualification which will equip students for any career involving written and/or spoken communication.  It is a universally recognised qualification for entry into college/university courses particularly in the field of Arts and Humanities.  Past students with this qualification have gone on to study English Literature, Creative Writing, Law, Linguistics, Journalism, Media and Education, amongst other courses.

To download the course guide for English Literature please click the link below

English Literature course guide download

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES:

FRENCH / GERMAN

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

AS Year

The AS course will cover:

  1. Aspects of French/German-speaking society
  2. Artistic culture in the French/German-speaking world
  3. Grammar
  4. A literary text or a film

A Level Year

The A Level course will cover:

  1. Social issues and trends
  2. Political and artistic culture
  3. Grammar
  4. Literary texts and films

We want students who: Have a genuine interest in developing their comprehension and communication skills in a Foreign Language beyond GCSE; students who will be proactive in using media and internet resources to develop their language abilities and who are interested in gaining an understanding of the culture of countries and communities where French / German is spoken.

How will students be assessed?

AS Level paper 1:  Listening, Reading and Writing (45% of AS, 1 hour 45 minutes)

Candidates will answer a range of questions based on listening material and on a selection of written stimulus texts.  They will also complete a short translation into English.

AS Level paper 2:  Writing (25% of AS, 1 hour 30 minutes)

Candidates will translate a passage into French/German and answer one question (short essay) on a chosen literary text or a chosen film which has been studied.

AS Level paper 3: Speaking (30% of AS, 12 – 14 minutes)

Candidate will discuss one sub-theme from Aspects of French/German-speaking society and one sub-theme from Artistic culture in the French/German-speaking world based on a stimulus card for each sub-theme.

A Level paper 1:  Listening, Reading and Writing (50% of A Level, 2 hours 30 minutes)

Candidates will answer a range of questions based on listening material and on a selection of written stimulus texts about aspects of French/German-speaking society, artistic culture in the French/German-speaking world, and aspects of political life in the French/German speaking-society.  Candidates will also complete a translation into English and a translation into French/German.

A Level paper 2:  Writing (20% of A Level, 2 hours)

Candidates will answer one question in French/German on a set text + one question in French/German on a set film or 2 questions on set texts (approximately 300 words per essay).

A Level paper 3: Speaking (30% of A Level, 21 – 23 minutes, including preparation time)

Candidates will discuss a sub-theme based on a stimulus card (5 – 6 minutes) and give a presentation with discussion (9 – 10 minutes) on an individual research project.

What other courses does it complement?

Due to the current global economic climate, knowledge of a second language such as French or German is no longer a luxury, but desirable.  An A Level in French or German complements a wide variety of other A Level subjects such as English, the Sciences and the Humanities.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Numerous opportunities including Teaching, Interpreting, Translating, Bilingual Secretarial/PA work.  A qualification in a European language is increasingly seen as a useful additional qualification in a variety of careers eg. Law, Accountancy, Business Studies and Science.  There are more courses in Further Education which enable you to study a language as an addition to another qualification.

To download the course guide for French & German please click the link below

French & German course guide download

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

If students really enjoy Mathematics and are successful at it then Further Mathematics may be for them. It extends the A Level Mathematics content and can involve an extra application, Decision Mathematics, that looks at how to decide on the best approach to solve problems.

In addition to the A level maths content, students will study:

Further Pure Mathematics – Proof; Complex numbers; Matrices; Further algebra and functions; Further calculus; Further vectors; Polar coordinates; Hyperbolic functions; Differential equations.

There is then a choice between more Pure Maths, Mechanics, Statistics or Decision.  Some of the content covered in the different areas is shown below.

  • Decision Mathematics – Algorithms and graph theory; Algorithms on graphs; Algorithms on graphs II; Critical path analysis; Linear programming.
  • Mechanics – Momentum and impulse; Collisions; Centres of mass; Work and energy; Elastic strings and springs.
  • Probability and Statistics – Linear regression; Statistical distributions (discrete); Statistical distributions (continuous); Correlation; Hypothesis testing; Chi squared tests.

We want students who: Are motivated and enthusiastic about the magic of Mathematics and who aspire to discover more of its secrets by studying it at a higher level.  If students really enjoy Mathematics and are interested in studying Mathematics or a related subject, such as Physics or Engineering, at university then Further Mathematics is an excellent choice.

How will students be assessed?

Each area is assessed by examination at the end of year 13.  The length of examination is different for the different topics but is typically between 1.5 and 2 hours long.

What other courses does it complement?

It is the natural complement to numerate and scientific subjects, such as Physics and Chemistry, and can be useful to study alongside subjects with a statistical component such as Psychology and Geography.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Further Mathematics is an advantage for many university courses (including Oxbridge and Cambridge).  It is often a prerequisite for Mathematics degree courses. It is also very useful for many engineering, business, management and teaching courses.

To download the course guide for Further Mathematics please click the link below

Further Mathematics course guide download

EXTENDED PROJECT

AS LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

We also offer the Extended Project Qualification. This is a flexible, skills based course that will work with any AS or A Level course. The extended project is different to the other subjects as it does not require students to learn a large number of facts such as dates, names or concepts. Instead, students choose what they want to research and then are taught the skills that they will need to carry this out; forming an argument, analysing texts, managing projects and extended writing. These skills will help students with other subjects as well as being relevant to any further courses or careers they might want to pursue. Students can study whatever topic interests them the most.

Projects have included the studies on criminology to the impact of the Beatles. Students choose the content, but are given the skills to research this and produce a significant dissertation on their area of interest.

To download the course guide for Extended Project please click the link below

Extended Project course guide download

GEOGRAPHY

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

A Level Geography offers a natural progression from GCSE. We ask students to look at contemporary and topical issues, challenging them to consider their place in the world.

This engaging and flexible course gives students the opportunity to:

  • study the relationship between human populations with their physical environment at a variety of scales from the local to the global;
  • consider their own role in relation to themes and issues being studied and the roles, values and attitudes of others including decision makers.

The specification follows an issues and impacts approach to contemporary Geography that is suitable for all students. Topics range from Tectonic Processes and Change to Globalisation, with additional topics such as Coasts, Superpowers and Health, Human Rights and Intervention studied at A level.

We want students who: Show a genuine appreciation of our changing world and use a wide range of skills, which they can apply to a variety of situations; can work independently on a task or take an active role in a small group. Students should enjoy lively debate and appreciate how we as individuals can influence the future of our planet. Geographers should be competent in using ICT.

There will be a mandatory 4 days fieldwork as part of the new A Level specification which will be undertaken during the two year course.

How will students be assessed?

A Level: 3 written exams and 1 piece of coursework

  • Paper 1: Physical Geography: Tectonic Processes, Glaciation, Water Cycle and Water Insecurity, The Carbon Cycle and Energy Insecurity (30%, 2 hour exam).
  • Paper 2: Human Geography: Globalisation, Superpowers, Regenerating Places and Health, Human Rights and Intervention (30%, 2 hour exam).
  • Paper 3: Synoptic Investigation: Resources on a geographical issue (20%, 1¾ hour exam).
  • Coursework: Independent Investigation – Non-examined assessment (20%, 3-4000 words).

What other course does it complement?

Geography complements a wide range of other subjects in both the arts and sciences faculties. Examples range from Biology and Mathematics to English, Modern Foreign Languages and Government and politics.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Geography can lead to further study at degree level, or as a supportive qualification for either a science or arts degree. Career prospects are wide ranging and include: The travel & tourism industry, retail, transport, local government, teaching, the Environment Agency, military, management, mapping and planning to name but a few.

To download the course guide for Geography please click the link below

Geography course guide download

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE

LEVEL 3 CAMBRIDGE TECHNICAL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Health and Social Care could be a new subject to many students. It is a broad range subject and encapsulates this through a variety of units such as effective communication, an individual’s rights and needs, cultural diversity, safeguarding adults, caring for children and young people.  This course will prepare students for further study and is an ideal foundation for students entering the modern workplace, providing them with a theoretical background reinforced with practical skills.  This course also develops research, evaluation and problem solving skills.

We want students who:  May want to try something new or want to develop their knowledge and understanding of health and social care in Britain today. Students who take this subject need to be highly organised, hard-working and committed to completing coursework.  It is also important that students can work independently as well as in groups.

How will students be assessed?

This is a two year course.  Assessment will be through portfolios of work, which will be assessed by your teacher and moderated by an OCR visiting moderator.

What other courses does it complement?

Health and Social Care complements Sociology and Biology.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

A qualification in Health and Social Care will provide relevant experiences to allow students to move to a career in Health, Social Care and Early Years but it is also a respected starting point for other careers. It will allow students to progress into further education, higher level apprenticeship or employment. Career opportunities include Childhood and Youth Studies, Nutrition and Health, all areas of Nursing, Midwifery, Counselling, Paramedic and Ambulance Roles, Social Work, Physiotherapy, Local Authority Services, Education Welfare and Complementary Therapies.

To download the course guide for Health & Social Care please click the link below

Health & Social Care course guide download

HISTORY

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

The History department aims to fire students’ curiosity about the past and to equip our young people with the skills to reach their potential throughout their lives.

In AS Level History, there are two papers:

  • Paper One focuses on the Tudors between 1485 and 1547. Students will investigate several things including how the Tudors came to the throne after the Wars of the Roses and the reasons for Henry VIII’s break with Rome.
  • Paper Two focuses on the USA between 1945 and 1963. Students will explore the impact of different Presidents including Truman, Eisenhower and Kennedy. There are several themes within this unit such as the Cold War, civil rights and the changing American economy.

In A Level History, our students will complete three papers; the exam units follow on chronologically from the AS Level subject content.

  • Paper One focuses on the Tudors between 1485 and 1603. As well as studying the reigns of King Henry VII and King Henry VIII, students will decide whether or not the reign of the boy-king Edward VI deserves to be labelled as a ‘mid-Tudor crisis’. Students will also examine whether or not Mary I deserves to be called ‘Bloody Mary’ and we know they will want to find out more about the most intriguing monarch, Queen Elizabeth I.
  • Paper Two focuses on the USA between 1945 and 1980. Students will explore the impact of different Presidents including Truman, Kennedy and Nixon. The themes of the Cold War, civil rights and the changing American economy will be investigated and we know they will want to investigate the infamous Watergate Affair.
  • Paper Three is a ‘historical study’ which students will investigate and research before writing up their findings.

We want students who: Are enthusiastic and committed to studying History. The ability to use their initiative and be organised is crucial.

How will students be assessed?

  • AS Level Paper One: One exam lasting 1 hour 30 minutes. This paper is worth 50% of the AS Level.
  • AS Level Paper Two: One exam lasting 1 hour 30 minutes. This paper is worth 50% of the AS Level.
  • A Level Paper One: One exam lasting 2 hours 30 minutes. This paper is worth 40% of the A Level.
  • A Level Paper Two: One exam lasting 2 hours 30 minutes. This paper is worth 40% of the A Level.
  • A Level Paper Three: An essay of 3000-3500 words. This paper is worth 20% of the A Level.

What other courses does it complement?

History A Level complements a wide range of other courses as a result of the variety of skills developed. The ability to analyse is tested in a range of other subjects including the sciences, Geography and Psychology. The communication skills developed connect to subjects such as English Language, English Literature and Philosophy.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Well motivated students in the past have earned excellent grades and have gone on to study History, Law and Engineering. Other students have used their A Level History to support a wide range of further education courses at university or college. The training in logic, deduction, listening, researching and evidential skills have allowed graduates to enter industrial middle management, archive and museum work, publishing and journalism, politics and teaching.

To download the course guide for History please click the link below

History course guide download

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

LEVEL 3 CAMBRIDGE TECHNICALS IN IT

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate in IT from the exam board OCR, is a course that will give you the opportunity through applied learning to develop the specialist knowledge, skills and understanding required in the IT sector. The course is the equivalent to one A Level. Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate in IT aims to encourage you to develop key knowledge in understanding:

  • The principles of IT and Global Information Systems.
  • How the IT sector changes at a rapid pace.
  • How organisations manage their IT infrastructure, and how the flow of information on a global scale is managed.
  • The importance of legal and security issues in IT infrastructure.

Core Unit Summary:

Unit 1: Fundamentals of IT

A sound understanding of IT technologies and practices is essential for IT professionals. Information learnt in this unit will create a solid foundation in the fundamentals of hardware, networks, software, the ethical use of computers and how businesses use IT.

Unit 2: Global Information

The purpose of this unit is to demonstrate the uses of information in the public domain, globally, in the cloud and across the Internet, by individuals and organisations. You will discover that good management of both data and information is essential and that it can give any organisation a competitive edge.

Unit 3: Cyber Security

This unit has been designed to enable you to gain knowledge and understanding of the range of threats, vulnerabilities and risks that impact on both individuals and organisations. You will learn about the solutions that can be used to prevent or deal with cyber security incidents resulting from these challenges. You will be able to apply your knowledge and understanding of cyber security issues and solutions by reviewing and making recommendations for ways to best protect digital systems and information.

We want students who:

  • Are motivated and willing to work hard and have an interest in technical aspects of IT.
  • Are willing to complete independent tasks in study time in school and at home.

How will students be assessed?

The course is split into five units of study; consisting of three mandatory and two optional units. The mandatory units are:

  • Unit 1 – Fundamentals of IT – assessed through a 1 hour and 30-minute written exam.
  • Unit 2 – Global Information – assessed through a 1 hour and 30-minute written exam.
  • Unit 3 – Cyber Security – assessed through a 1 hour written exam.
  • Two further units will be taught which will be from ‘Project Management’, ‘Product Development’, ‘Systems Analysis and Design’ and ‘Internet of Everything’.

What other courses does it complement?

The course will complement a wide range of subjects, including Business Studies, English and Technology.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

The course will allow you to access a wide range of further education courses at University including a degree in ICT or computing.

To download the course guide for IT please click the link below

IT course guide download

MATHEMATICS

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject Description and course outline

Mathematics is one of the fundamental building blocks of the universe and is used to describe nearly everything within it. Study at A Level enables students to explore the world of Mathematics in greater depth looking at Mathematics both for its own sake and also its applications in the real world. The course is split into two areas Core Mathematics and Applied Mathematics.

Core Mathematics looks at what Maths is all about including the rules and patterns that everything is built upon and consists of four units.  Applied Mathematics looks at how Maths can be applied to real situations, in particular the use of data (Statistics) and motion of objects (Mechanics).

Students will study:

  • Pure Mathematics including Proof; Algebra and functions; Coordinate geometry in the (x,y); Sequences and series; Trigonometry; Exponentials and logarithms; Differentiation; Integration; Numerical methods.
  • Probability and Statistics – Statistical sampling; Data presentation and Interpretation; Probability; Statistical distributions; Statistical hypothesis testing.
  • Mechanics 1 – Quantities and units in mechanics; Kinematics; Forces and Newton’s laws; Moments.

How will students be assessed?

The course is externally assessed with three 2 hour exam papers each worth 100 marks, taken at the end of the course.

We want students who:  Are motivated and enthusiastic about the magic of Mathematics and who aspire to discover more of its secrets. If students really enjoy Mathematics and are interested in studying Mathematics or a related subject, such as Physics or Engineering, at university then Further Mathematics is an excellent choice.

What other courses does it complement?

It is the natural complement to numerate and scientific subjects, such as Physics and Chemistry, and can be useful to study alongside subjects with a statistical component such as Psychology and Geography.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Mathematics A Level is a highly regarded qualification both within Further Education and in employment. It is also considered to be a challenging, though enjoyable, subject to study.

A Level Mathematics can be a requirement for many degree courses e.g Accountancy, all fields of Engineering, Computer Science, Medicine and any Mathematics related subject.  It is also very useful for many business, management and teaching courses.

To download the course guide for Mathematics please click the link below

Mathematics course guide download

PERFORMING ARTS

BTEC LEVEL 3 NATIONAL EXTENDED CERTIFICATE

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

The Edexcel BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in PA is a 360 guided learning hour (GLH) qualification that consists of four units.  Three of the units are mandatory and one is student’s individual choice. It offers an engaging programme for those who are clear about Performing Arts being part of their future career.  The four units are split across two years of study:

Year 1

Unit 1 – Investigating Practitioners’ work (External Assessment)

Unit 2 – Developing skills and techniques for a Live Performance (Internal Assessment)

Year 2

Unit 3 – Group Performance Workshop (External Assessment)

Unit 4 – Optional – performance strengths e.g. dance, music, acting (Internal Assessment)

We want students who: Aspire to work in an industry where creative, imaginative and independent skills are essential. Students should prefer creative project style work and investigating real situations.  Students need to be able to work as part of a group and communicate their ideas through performances.

How will students be assessed?

Students will produce a portfolio of evidence for each unit that will be internally assessed.  The two externally assessed units will be performed live in front of a moderator.

What other courses does it complement?

This course complements many courses as it develops essential life skills that are transferable to any career path.  It can help with building confidence skills, public speaking and working as part of a team.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

A qualification in Performing Arts can allow students to go on to study Performing Arts, Dance, Music or Drama at university.  It could also be the first step to a career in the Performing Arts industry either as a performer or on the production side of the industry.  Most employment industries now seek employees who are creative, imaginative and inventive and these transferable skills are developed in this subject.

To download the course guide for Performing Arts please click the link below

Performing Arts course guide download

RS: PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Year 12 – Unit 1 Philosophy

How are we here? Why are we here? What is the meaning and purpose of life? We explore traditional arguments for existence of God. Why do bad things happen to good people? We reflect upon the problem of evil and how philosophers have tried to solve this issue over the last 2500 years. How can we know what God is like? Do we reincarnate?

Year 12 – Unit 2 Ethics

Should terrorists be set free? Why do we punish criminals? Utilitarianism attempts to answer the big questions in ethics by saying that you do the action that creates the most amount of happiness. Should you always do your duty? Should you always follow the rules? Is it ever right to lie? Kant says that it is all about duty and following the moral law within. All you need is love! According to Situation Ethics you should always do the most loving thing.

Year 12 – Unit 3 A Study of Religion

Who is Jesus? Should we believe the Bible? Jesus the revolutionary! What is God truly like? Does He exist? Can you be rich and a Christian?

Year 13 – Unit 1 Philosophy

Is religious faith rational?  Does it make sense? Is religious language meaningful? Can it be verified? Tested? Is religious faith compatible with scientific evidence? Can religion and science coexist? Can all Religious experience be explained by Psychology?

Year 13 – Unit 2 Ethics

Can we be too courageous? What are the fundamental virtues that we need as a community? Am I the most important being in existence? Can we say that something is good or bad? Do we all have the right to life? Should we always do our duty?

Year 13 – Unit 3 A study of Religion

What is Feminism? Are men and Women the same? Can a woman be a Christian? Virtues or values or both? Who was Jesus? Did he really exist?

We want students who:  Are not afraid to discuss and debate their opinions; are not afraid to try and are resilient; are hard-working and dedicated with good essay writing skills; and who want to be challenged to think beyond the everyday.

How will students be assessed?

AS Level

Students are assessed by three papers at the end of Year 12. Each paper has four questions with two parts. Each of the four topics has a question.

A Level

Students are assessed by three papers at the end of Year 13.

What other courses does it complement?

Philosophy and Ethics: RS combines well with both arts based subjects like English, History, Sociology, Geography, Art as well as science based subjects like Physics, Maths, Chemistry and Biology.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Philosophy and Ethics: Religious Studies is an extremely well respected academic subject. Every university respects it as a good qualification. Employers see it as an interesting subject that develops the thinking skills required for the modern work place. Philosophy and Ethics students have gone on to study a wide variety of subjects at university; these include, Law, Medicine, Physics, Biology, English, Midwifery, Criminology, nursing, social work and teaching.

To download the course guide for Philosophy & Ethics please click the link below

Philosophy & Ethics course guide download

PHYSICS

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

A Level Physics is an exciting subject enabling students to appreciate how fundamental Science works and to study the history of the key developments influencing Physics.

AS Level

  • Measurements and their errors
  • Particles and Radiation
  • Waves
  • Mechanics and Materials
  • Electricity

A Level

  • The full A Level examines all of the above and:
  • Further Mechanics and Thermal Physics
  • Fields and their consequences
  • Nuclear Physics
  • Option module: Turning points in physics

We want students who:  Are motivated, hardworking, inquisitive, independent and resilient with a love of Physics.

How will students be assessed?

AS Level – There will be two ninety minute papers worth seventy marks each to assess the AS. There is no coursework but practical understanding will be assessed in the papers. Both papers assess the full AS content. Paper 1 has 70 marks of short and long answer questions split by topic. Paper 2 is split into three sections. Section A: 20 marks of short and long answer questions on practical skills and data analysis. Section B: 20 marks of short and long answer questions from across all areas of AS content. Section C: 30 multiple choice questions.

A Level – There will be three two hour papers of 85 marks for papers 1 and 2 and 80 for the paper 3. Paper 1 and paper 2 have 60 marks of short and long answer questions and 25 multiple choice questions on content. Paper 3 has 45 marks of short and long answer questions on practical experiments and data analysis. There are 35 marks of short and long answer questions on the Turning Points in Physics topic.

What other courses does it complement?

Physics is a very versatile A Level which can open many doors in the future. It complements several other A Levels including Mathematics, Further Mathematics, Chemistry, Engineering, Product Design and Geography.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Studying A Level Physics can open up many diverse career opportunities for students and prepare them for some of the more challenging degree courses in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). These can include the medicinal sciences, becoming a research scientist, all forms of engineering, financial careers such as accountants and stockbrokers, working in the oil and gas industry, architects, sports scientists and many aspects of the nuclear and energy industry.

To download the course guide for Physics please click the link below

Physics course guide download

POLITICS

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject Description and Outline

The A Level course in Politics covers a range of political issues and how countries are governed. Students will undertake 3 modules for their A Level course. Students will study the following:

  • UK Government
  • UK Politics and Political Ideas
  • Comparative Politics – The Politics of the USA

Within these topic areas students will assess key issues such as voting behaviour, political participation as well as the British Constitution and Parliament. Students will develop a broad knowledge and understanding of the political system and ideologies throughout the 2 year course. Due to A level reform we are hoping to follow the Edexcel specification but this is still awaiting accreditation.

We want students who:  Who are interested in politics and the world around them. Students need to have a keen interest in political issues as well as how countries are governed. We want students who are independent thinkers and are able to follow key issues of the day through newspapers and the televised media. We also want students who have good writing skills and are analytical. Politics covers a broad range of topics and we want students who can demonstrate high level thinking skills in order to get the best out of the course.

How will students be assessed?

Students will be assessed by three examinations of 2 hours, consisting of source based and structured questions for their A Level.

What other courses does it complement?

Politics links well with other Humanities based subjects such as History. It also links with English, Sociology and Religious Studies as these subjects are also essay based.

Next steps – what does this course lead to?

Students go on to a wide range of further education courses at university or college. It is particularly useful for those interested in careers in Law, Journalism and of course Politics. Students have also gone onto careers in teaching law as well as a variety of graduate entry jobs and the analytical skills developed are also useful for a wide range of apprenticeships.

To download the course guide for Politics please click the link below

Politics course guide download

PRODUCT DESIGN

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Product Design is a creative and practical subject where students make the decisions about what they design and make. In Year 12 they experience a range of short focussed design and practical activities. In Year 13 students select a major project and make a full size working prototype, the choice is wide and varied and could include anything from furniture to engineered products.

We want students who: Are creative and who enjoy designing. If a student is the sort of person who looks at a product and wonders how it is made or thinks about how it could be improved then Product Design might be for them. If they take things apart to see how they work then they might have the sort of enquiring mind which would suit this course.

Students would not need to have studied GCSE Product Design or Engineering to access this course.

How will students be assessed?

AQA Design and Technology; Product design 7552

This is a linear course which means that candidates will be assessed at the end of Year 13.

They will take three papers.

Paper One is a mixture of short, multiple choice, and extended questions based on core design and technology knowledge, and is worth 25% of the A-Level

Paper Two is a mixture of short, multiple choice, and extended questions based on specialist knowledge, technical designing and making principles, and is worth 25% of the A-Level.

The third paper is the non-examination assessment. This is an extended design and make project which allows candidates to demonstrate their research and analytical skills as well as their creative designing and making skills.

This section is worth 50% of the A-Level.

What other courses does it complement?

Product Design matches well with sciences, Maths and Art.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

There are many career opportunities including creative design, for example Product Design, Graphic Design, Theatre or Stage Design, Publishing, Television, Film or Radio Software, Games Design and Design Architecture. There are also a variety of pathways available in Engineering; these include Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, Civil, Marine, Production, Design and many more.

To download the course guide for Product Design please click the link below

Product Design course guide download

SOCIOLOGY

A LEVEL

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

Sociology is a popular subject at A Level. It focuses on how people behave in groups and covers a wide range of topics including crime and deviance and education.  Lessons involve a mix of individual, paired and group work with plenty of opportunity for discussion as well as a focus on developing exam skills, including essay writing.

In Year 12 students will study the following compulsory units:

  • Education
  • Methods in Context
  • Research Methods

…and one of the following optional topics:

  • Families and households
  • Culture and identity
  • Health
  • Work, poverty and welfare

For the full A level, compulsory units are Education with theory and methods and Crime and Deviance with theory and methods.  Optional topics include Families and Households, Beliefs in Society and the Media.

We want students who: Have an interest in how contemporary society works. They will need to be able to develop critical and reflective thinking skills.  A respect for social diversity is crucial to enable students to develop their own sociological awareness through active engagement with the social world around them.  Students will often need to be able to question their own values and beliefs and must be open-minded in their approach to this subject.

How will students be assessed?

For all students in Year 12, there are two AS exams; there is no coursework.  For those doing the full A level, there are three exams at the end of Year 13.

What other courses does it complement?

Its focus on the study of human social behaviour means that Sociology goes well with subjects such as History, Geography, Health & Social Care and Psychology.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

Sociology is very useful for any job role involving working with people, such as social work, nursing, teaching, the police or human resources.

To download the course guide for Sociology please click the link below

Sociology course guide download

SPORT

BTEC LEVEL 3 NATIONAL EXTENDED CERTIFICATE

FOR ENTRY SEPTEMBER 2017

Subject description and course outline

The Edexcel BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport is a 360 guided learning hour (GLH) qualification that consists of four units.  Three of the units are mandatory. It offers an engaging programme for those who are clear about sport being part of their future career.  The four units are split across two years of study:

Year 1

Unit 1   – Anatomy and Physiology (External Exam)

Unit 3   – Professional Development in the Sports Industry

Year 2

Unit 2   – Fitness Training & Programming for Health, Sport & Well-Being (External Assessment)

Unit 7   – Practical Sports Performance

We want students who: Are passionate about sport and keep up to date with current sporting issues.  Students must be good independent learners who are willing to voice their opinions on sporting issues.  A sound scientific knowledge base and active involvement in sports is also essential to success.

How will students be assessed?

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificates in Sport units are assessed through project and assignment work and well as an external exam.  Each unit is graded Pass, Merit or Distinction and then an overall grade of Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction * is awarded on completion.

Students are continuously assessed throughout the course. For each unit national standards are laid down, in which students have to show they are competent. Teachers ensure that students are given opportunities to do this through projects, assignments, case studies and problem-solving situations. Every time students provide evidence that they are competent in a particular area, it is recorded on tracking sheets, until they have completed the full set of units that add up to the correct number of credits for that course.

What other courses does it complement?

This course complements any areas of study that requires independent work.  It would also work well along-side science based subjects, especially Biology.

Next steps – what this course can lead to

The course gives learners the knowledge, understanding and skills that they need to prepare for employment.  The qualification also provides career development opportunities and progression opportunities to higher education, degree and professional development programmes within the sports industry.

To download the course guide for Sport please click the link below

Sport course guide download